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ERIC Number: ED433287
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1999-Apr
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Reconceptualizing Educational Transfer: Brazilian Curriculum Field in the Nineties.
Moreira, Antonio Flavio Barbosa; Macedo, Elizabeth
A study examined the conception of educational transfer, considering the foreign influence in Brazilian curriculum throughout the 1990s. The study criticizes the literature on educational transfer produced in the 1970s, mainly the works of Martin Carnoy (1974) and Philip Altbach and Gail Kelly (1984), arguing that their two theories understress the idiosyncrasies of cultural, political, social, and institutional contexts of both central and peripherical countries. The study also argues that resistances, rejections, and transformations which take place during the transfer process are not sufficiently considered in the aforementioned theories. The study then draws on scholars who have been analyzing economic and cultural globalization to understand the peculiarities involved in the transfer process developed particularly in Latin America in this decade and contends that the categories of globalization and hybridization are useful to this understanding, since they leave room for the complexity and contradictions that characterize the process. Interviews were conducted with 11 selected specialists in curriculum from different Brazilian states. The specialists view the contemporary Brazilian curriculum field including three levels: curricular official policies; theoretical production; and school practice. Findings suggest that the field oscillates between an autonomous production with a critical incorporation of foreign discourses and an acritical "transfer" of curriculum theories created in the developed nations. (Contains 30 references.) (BT)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Brazil