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ERIC Number: ED430711
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1998-Aug
Pages: 93
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-1-899120-77-7
ISSN: N/A
Implementing Children's Rights: What Can the UK Learn from International Experience?
Ruxton, Sandy
The welfare and treatment of children is a key test of society's commitment to human and social development. This report details a study of the implementation of the 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in the United Kingdom (UK) and contrasts the U.K. approach with those adopted in other states, focusing on those at comparable stages of economic, social, and political development. Methods used in the study included a literature review of appropriate documents, such as summaries of U.N. Committee hearings and state party reports; questionnaires completed by staff of nongovernmental agencies and government officials; and follow-up telephone interviews. The report outlines arguments for the promotion of children's rights, explains the significance of the U.N. Convention, and identifies how the Convention can be used as a tool for implementing children's rights. The bulk of the report compares the approaches to reporting adopted in other countries and the measures put in place to support implementation of the Convention. The report examines recent developments in the U.K., draws out conclusions, and provides recommendations as to how positive approaches to reporting and implementation can be most effectively pursued within the U.K. References are listed throughout the report. (KB)
Save the Children, Publication Sales, 17 Grove Lane, London, SE5 8RD, England, United Kingdom (7.5 British pounds).
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Save the Children, London (England).
Identifiers - Location: United Kingdom
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child