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ERIC Number: ED429158
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1999-Jan
Pages: 38
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
NYU Institute for Education & Social Policy Progress Report Outcomes Study.
New York Univ., NY. Inst. for Education and Social Policy.
New York Networks for School Renewal (NYNSR) is a 5-year collaborative project begun in 1995 as part of an effort to revitalize U.S. schools through public-private partnerships. Four New York organizations with years of experience in public education reform have joined in the NYNSR collaboration. An outcomes evaluation collected and analyzed both school-level and student-level data from NYNSR schools using databases constructed for the program. The NYNSR began with 80 founding schools and added an additional 60 public schools and programs, many in low-income areas. These 140 schools, which have a larger population of African American and Latino students than other New York City public schools, serve some 50,000 students. Between spring 1996 and spring 1997, the proportion of students in the 80 "founding schools" who read at or above the national norms for grades 3 through 8 rose 5%. More than 70% of parents and guardians surveyed were satisfied or very satisfied with the quality of teaching, what students learn, and safety in the schools. Although the smaller schools had a somewhat higher cost per student, their higher graduation rates and lower dropout rates mean that they have produced the lowest cost per graduate in the city school system. In addition to increasing student achievement, NYNSR has expanded community and outside institutional involvement in the creation, governance, and culture of public schools. (Contains 6 tables, 5 figures, 21 graphs, and 1 map.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Annenberg Foundation, St. Davids, PA.
Authoring Institution: New York Univ., NY. Inst. for Education and Social Policy.