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ERIC Number: ED427860
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1998-Aug
Pages: 49
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Eating Breakfast: Effects of the School Breakfast Program.
Devaney, Barbara; Stuart, Elizabeth
Begun as a pilot in 1966, the School Breakfast Program (SBP) is designed to provide funding for meals to ensure that children's nutritional needs are met. In recent years, researchers have become interested in the question of whether the availability of SBPs at school increases the likelihood of a child eating breakfast. This study was a reanalysis of data from the 1992 School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study (SNDA-1). That study found that a school SBP did not increase the likelihood of a child eating breakfast; breakfast was defined as any food with at least 50 calories. To define breakfast more substantively in this study, a review of the literature was conducted, and three definitions of breakfast were developed: (1) consumption of any food or beverage; (2) breakfast intake of food energy greater than 10 percent of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA); or (3) consumption of foods from at least two of five main food groups and intake of food energy greater than 10 percent of the RDA. Findings showed that as the definition of breakfast becomes more robust, the percentage of students who eat breakfast declines. Almost 9 of 10 students consumed any food or beverage, but only 6 of 10 met the third definition. For low-income students, as the definition of breakfast becomes more robust, the SBP is associated with an increased likelihood of eating breakfast. (Contains 20 references.) (EV)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC. Office of Analysis and Evaluation.
Authoring Institution: Mathematica Policy Research, Princeton, NJ.