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ERIC Number: ED425385
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1998-Aug
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Personal Striving Level and Self-Evaluation Process.
Orias, John; Leung, Lisa; Dosanj, Shikha; McAnlis, JoAnna; Levy, Gal; Sheposh, John P.
Three studies were conducted to determine if goal striving level was related to accurate self-knowledge. The purpose of the research was to determine if the tendency of high strivers to confront stressful stimuli extends to self-evaluation processes. Three experiments were designed to investigate whether high strivers differ from low strivers in their inquires about possession of certain personality traits. It was reasoned that high strivers would choose more diagnostic questions in their quest for self-understanding. Study 1 tested the relationship between striving level and choice of diagnostic information. Self-esteem was measured as a moderating variable. Studies 2 and 3 also examined the relationship between striving and information preference; in addition, the motives underlying the self-evaluation process for high and low strivers are explored. Participants (N=106) first generated personal striving lists and then responded on a self-reflection task in which they selected questions about traits that varied in degree of diagnosticity. Instruments used included: Self Concept Clarity Scale (Campbell, et al., 1996); Self Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965); and the Self-Evaluation Scale for Diagnosticity (Sedikides, 1993). Results from all three studies provide evidence that high strivers seek more diagnostic information than low strivers. Results from Study 2 and Study 3 suggest that self-verification is the strongest determinant of the self-evaluation process. (Author/EMK)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (106th, San Francisco, CA, August 14-18, 1998).