NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED420447
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1998-Jun
Pages: 3
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Nonresident Fathers Can Make a Difference in Children's School Performance. Issue Brief.
Nord, Christine Winquist
Using data from the 1996 National Household Education Survey (NHES:96), this issue brief looks at the involvement of nonresident fathers in terms of how such involvement affects student performance in grades K-12. In the NHES, resident parents reported on whether nonresident parents who had had contact with their children in the past year had participated in any of the following four types of school activities: general school meeting, regularly scheduled parent-teacher conferences, school or class event, and volunteer opportunities. The following findings are highlighted: (1) most nonresident fathers are not very involved in their children's schools; (2) children are less likely to have ever repeated a grade or been suspended or expelled if their nonresident fathers are involved in their schools; (3) children are more likely to get A's in school, to enjoy school, and to participate in extracurricular activities if their nonresident fathers are involved in the schools. The issue brief concludes by noting that inconsistencies about the benefits of nonresident fathers' continued involvement with their children in extant studies may be due in large part to the fact that contact is often used to measure involvement. The current findings suggest that it is not contact, per se, that is associated with improved student outcomes, but rather active participation in children's lives through involvement in the schools. (HTH)
Phone: 800-424-1616; World Wide Web: http://NCES.ed.gov
Publication Type: Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: National Household Education Survey