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ERIC Number: ED419473
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1998-May
Pages: 4
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Employment and Postsecondary Persistence and Attainment. Indicator of the Month.
National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.
This brief report presents data on employment and postsecondary persistence and attainment of higher education students, based on data from the 1990 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study, Second Follow-up. Major findings include: (1) five years after initial enrollment, 89 percent of students had worked at some time while enrolled, with 75 percent working part time and 15 percent working full time; (2) students enrolled at four-year institutions were likely to work fewer hours than students who attended public two-year or for-profit institutions; (3) only 31 percent of students who worked full time had attained a degree or were still enrolled five years after initial enrollment, compared to 79 percent of students who worked 1-15 hours per week; (4) students who worked full time were more likely to attend school exclusively part time and part time students were less likely to persist and attain a degree five years after initial entry. Tables and graphs detail data on: percentage of 1989 beginning postsecondary students, by average hours worked per week while enrolled and control and type of first institution; and percentage of 1989-90 beginning postsecondary students who attained a degree or were still enrolled by spring 1994, by control and type of first institution and average hours worked per week. (DB)
National Education Data Resource Center; phone: 703-845-3151; e-mail: nedrc@inet.ed.gov; http://www.ed.gov/NCES/pubs/ce
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study