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ERIC Number: ED419347
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1998-Apr
Pages: 32
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Research in the Study of Reading Disability: What Have We Learned in the Past Four Decades?.
Vellutino, Frank R.; Scanlon, Donna M.
This paper summarizes some of the most important findings from research that evaluated the hypothesized causes of specific reading disability (dyslexia). It first discusses the immediate causes of reading difficulties in terms of deficiencies in component reading skills that might cause such difficulties and concludes that inadequate facility in word identification caused by more basic deficits in alphabetic coding are the immediate and most basic causes of difficulties in learning to read. The paper then discusses hypothesized deficiencies in cognitive abilities underlying reading ability as basic causes of specific reading disability, and concludes that phonological skills deficiencies associated with phonological coding deficits are the probable causes of the disorder rather than visual, semantic, or syntactic deficits. Hypothesized deficits in general learning abilities are also ruled out as probable causes of reading disability. The paper concludes with a brief review of results from an intervention study that tracked the progress of children classified in first grade as impaired or normally developing readers from the time they entered kindergarten through the end of fourth grade. Findings demonstrate that only a very small percentage of children with reading impairments are afflicted by basic cognitive deficits that underlie their reading difficulties. (Contains 2 figures and 66 references.) (Author/CR)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the American Educational Research Association (San Diego, CA, April 1998).