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ERIC Number: ED413861
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1997
Pages: 6
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Tenure, Promotion, and Distance Teaching: A Study of Faculty Rewards and Incentives.
Wolcott, Linda L.
Faced with declining resources, increased public scrutiny, and pressures to accommodate the needs of a changing student population, colleges and universities look to innovative uses of technology as supplements to and alternatives for mainstream instruction. Faculty are increasingly becoming involved in distance/distributed education. This study looks at the institutional reward systems for distance education at four Carnegie Category I research institutions. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 34 individuals representing faculty, distance education program administrators, and chief academic officers. The institutions in the study share a similar tripartite mission of teaching, research, and service. At the institutional level, distance education is a low priority while at the college and department level, the commitment to distance education is greater. Similarly, within the context of the academic unit, more so than at the institutional level, administrators recognize faculty efforts in distance education and reward them according to department or college priorities. Distance education is not explicitly identified as an area of professional practice which serves as a measure of faculty productivity. Credit for distance education activity falls under the category of teaching where it counts toward the individual's overall teaching record or as a teaching innovation. Faculty work in distance education is acknowledged and credited at the department level and during annual performance reviews. Downsides to participating in distance education can range in severity from uncertainty about whether and how much credit will be accorded, to placing one's career in jeopardy for engaging in distance education to the detriment of discipline-based research and scholarly publication. (SWC)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A