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ERIC Number: ED413034
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1997-Oct
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Anthologies in the College Curriculum: A Pro and Con Debate.
Dillon, Dallas E.; Piro, Vince; Nicoll-Johnson, Mark
The three papers collected in this document present opinions for and against the use of anthologies in introductory writing and literature classes at community colleges. The first paper, "College Students Must Read Book-Length Works," by Dallas E. Dillon, proposes that students, even non-traditional community college students, should be pushed to read full-length books; that anthologies serve the interests of publishing houses rather than readers; and that excerpts from works do not give students the full meaning of the work. The second paper, "Voices, Voices, Voices: A Case for Anthologies in the College Curriculum," by Vince Piro, argues that anthologies offer students a variety of voices that differ from their own ethnic group, age, or gender and which they may not have encountered in any other forum. This paper also reviews specific contributions anthologies have made to ethnic identification, gender and sexual identity, literary schools, geographic identity, and radical points of view. The final paper, "Choosing Texts: Some Complexities and an Exhortation," by Mark Nicoll-Johnson, reviews problems involved in using full-length texts, including pressure from cost-conscious administrators and assigning whole books to students who have never read an entire book, but suggests, however, that their use can stimulate humanistic inquiry, reflection, and ultimately empowerment for students. Each paper contains references. (BCY)
Publication Type: Collected Works - General; Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the English Council of California Two Year Colleges Statewide Conference (San Francisco, CA, Oct. 16-18, 1997).