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ERIC Number: ED411336
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1997-Jan
Pages: 79
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Alternative High School Scheduling. A View from the Student's Desk. Research Report.
Pisapia, John; Westfall, Amy Lynn
In 1995 the Metropolitan Educational Research Consortium (MERC), Richmond (Virginia) commissioned a study of alternative high school scheduling modules to determine the effects of different schedules on teaching strategies, teacher and student satisfaction, and student and school performance. This report presents the results of an analysis of the survey administered to 2,430 students in 4 inner city, 5 suburban, and 4 rural schools in 1995. Six types of scheduling, two traditional and four variations of block schedules, were studied. Students in everyday semester long block schedules reported significantly more satisfaction with the number of courses available to them than students in everyday short block schedules and alternating long block schedules. Students in everyday long block schedules also reported that their teachers used significantly more group instruction than students in the other block schedules, and observation suggested that use of group instruction increases as the number of minutes in class increase. Students in everyday semester long block schedules also reported that their teachers were more likely to use portfolios. No significant findings were associated with schedule type for homework, student-teacher relationships, curriculum, and student satisfaction. Analysis did identify differences that may or may not have been related to scheduling. These differences are explored in the 10 appendixes that summarize findings in terms of effects of schedule type on various dependent variables and present a summary of some focus group interviews. (Contains 4 tables, 13 references, and the student survey.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Metropolitan Educational Research Consortium, Richmond, VA.
Note: For related reports, see UD 031 866 and 868.