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ERIC Number: ED411177
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1996
Pages: 58
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Embracing America: A Look at Which Immigrants Become Citizens. Center Paper 11.
Bouvier, Leon
This report examines the question of which immigrants to the United States are more likely to be "Americanized" and absorbed into the American nation. The 1990 census found that about 40 percent of all foreign-born residents of the United States were naturalized citizens, while among those who arrived before 1980, about 60 percent were citizens. Factors influencing naturalization rates include country of origin and social and legal pressures in the sending countries that deter their nationals overseas from taking American citizenship. Using the 1990 census figures, this study examines the correlations between naturalization and a variety of socio-economic characteristics. The study is limited to those who are presumed to have been eligible for naturalization by 1990. Several general findings are reported with suggestions given as to the reasons for differences. The results point to immigration policy changes that may increase the likelihood of naturalization. Sections of the report include: (1) "Executive Summary"; (2) "Immigration and Adaptation"; (3) "Naturalization: What Is It?"; (4) "Sources of Data and Methodology"; (5) "Basic Naturalization Rates"; (6) "The Overall Demographic Picture"; (7) "The Overall Socio-Economic Picture"; (8) "Year of Entry: The Overall Picture"; (9) "Age at Entry into the United States"; (10) "The Overall Country Picture"; (11) "Educational Attainment"; (12) "Occupation"; (13) "Income and Poverty"; (14) "Household Type"; (15) "Language"; and (16) "Conclusion." (EH)
Center for Immigration Studies, 1815 H Street, N.W., Suite 1010, Washington, DC 20006-3604, 202-466-8185, FAX 202-466-8076, ($12.00).
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Center for Immigration Studies, Washington, DC.