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ERIC Number: ED409041
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1996-Jun-27
Pages: 70
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Class Success-Class Withdrawal. Research Report 96.6.1.0.
Geltner, Peter
Intended as a resource to help decrease student withdrawal and increase student success at California's Santa Monica College, this report presents results from a study of student withdrawal and success rates for 8 sessions, from winter 1994 through fall 1994. Following an overview of the project and general observations based on findings, tables of results are presented for the following 16 student characteristics: gender, ethnicity, age, day/night attendance status, residency status, resident students' first language, level of prior education, returning/first-time enrollment status, deferred or full matriculation status, foreign or local high school attendance, number of hours employed, educational goals, date that students add a class, major, cumulative grade point average, and student load. Highlighted findings include the following: (1) Asian and White males had higher withdrawal rates than Asian and White females, respectively, while no gender differences were found for other ethnic groups; (2) with respect to age, students between 20 and 24 had the lowest success rates, while those between 60 and 64 had the highest; (3) regarding student residence, those with F-1 visas had the lowest withdrawal rate, followed by non-resident students; (4) with respect to students' prior educational level, non-high school graduates had the highest withdrawal rate, followed by adult diploma students; and (5) students who did not work and those who worked only 1 to 9 hours per week withdrew at lower than average rates and succeeded at higher than average rates. (TGI)
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Santa Monica Coll., CA. Office of Institutional Research.