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ERIC Number: ED408705
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1997-Mar
Pages: 43
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Getting Better with Practice? A Longitudinal Study of Shared Leadership.
Meyers, Barbara; And Others
Despite the recent attention to shared decision making, there has been little research investigating the process. This paper presents and compares three case studies describing the leadership and decision making of three shared-decision-making teams over 4 years. The teams--from one primary, one middle, and one high school--were set in one school district in New York State. Data were gathered through participant observation. The data suggest that teams gradually adopted a more consensual model of leadership, which occurred both through use of consensus-based decisions and special project teams. Shared decision making is a dynamic phenomenon that is susceptible to many factors and varies across teams. The data demonstrate that: (1) decision-making patterns of teams are likely to change over time; (2) individuals in leadership roles tend to participate in a disproportionately high number of decisions and discussions; (3) teams may need to go through a clarifying stage in which they decide what to decide; (4) conflict may be necessary to promote team growth, role clarification, and delineation of a teams' vision; (5) decision-making patterns can be influenced directly by training and by stability of team membership; (6) special project teams can facilitate shared decision making; (7) it takes time to develop effective shared decision-making practices; and (8) administrative support can empower decision makers. Four tables are included. (Contains 10 references). (LMI)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, IL, March 24-28, 1997). Contains light broken type.