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ERIC Number: ED408379
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1997
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The New Morbidity: Risk Factors Associated with Violence.
Robinson, Bennie C.
An increasing number of young black males are over-represented among youth who are involved in homicides, accidents, and suicides. This is being called the "new morbidity," a term coined to describe the interrelationship of self-destructive and life-threatening behaviors particularly applicable to African American males. The new morbidity refers to conditions evolving from economic, cultural, and social forces. This report describes the results of a study that uses a "public health model" to examine a set of risk factors associated with an integrated approach to the study of violence. A proposal is offered for addressing the situation from a public health perspective. The study was designed to provide a more comprehensive understanding of assault victims' risk exposure and the resources directed at those risks by using the University of Kentucky trauma program database for July 1990 through September 1996. There were 1,410 records available. The majority of victims of violence (75.8%) were male, and young people were victimized most often. Of these cases, 135 black males and 188 white males were victims. Gunshot wounds and stabbings were the most common forms of violence recorded. Data support the belief that people in central cities have higher victimization rates and more severe injuries. Many surviving victims had extremely serious injuries, a finding that suggests the importance of further research into the costs and lost quality of life due to crime victimization. Victim outcomes might be enhanced by effectively linking public health data with police crime reports. (Contains 17 references.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Kentucky