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ERIC Number: ED408131
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1997-Apr
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Factors Associated with Early Risk for School-Aged Children Living in Rural Poverty.
De Haan, Laura; Gunvalson, Diane
Early onset of at-risk behaviors has been recognized as an important predictor of severity of negative outcomes during adolescence, but little is known about rural children's involvement in such behaviors and related variables. In two rural Midwest counties with high concentrations of child poverty, a survey of 162 predominantly Caucasian fifth- and sixth-graders examined levels of delinquency, substance use, and depression, as well as variables related to risk or protective factors. Findings indicate that a substantial subset of these children were experimenting with drugs, alcohol, or delinquency or were struggling with depression. Although the three risk categories were correlated, different variables were related to each. Delinquency was related to poverty, being male, and depression. Substance use was related to separating from parents, doing poorly in school, movement toward deviant behavior, and peer attachment. Several factors were related to depression, including identity development, poverty, autonomy, and grades. Boys and girls did not differ in the incidence of substance use or depression, but did differ as to predictor variables. Boys were more affected by economic hardship, while girls were influenced by internal factors such as identity development. Although the six school districts surveyed were within 30 miles of each other in a seemingly homogeneous rural context, the incidence of the three risk categories differed among schools. Contains 30 references. (SV)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: North Dakota State Univ., Fargo.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Research on Child Development (Washington, DC, April 1997).