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ERIC Number: ED405559
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1997
Pages: 165
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Literacy Professionals' Ways of Knowing: A National Survey. Reading Research Report No. 86.
Commeyras, Michelle; And Others
A study assessed how literacy professionals acquire knowledge as well as what knowledge they possess and value. A questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of K-12 teachers, reading specialists, administrators, library-media specialists, and teacher educators in the United States. Results were based on 1,519 responses and are discussed in terms of knowing through professional development (reading professional literature, teacher education, and teacher research) and knowing about three current pedagogical topics (book clubs, portfolio assessment, and motivation). Results indicated that literacy professionals: (1) read practitioner journal articles, books, and professional newspapers more often than research journals or electronic sources; (2) believe that collaborative experiences between mentor teachers, student teachers, and teacher educators were important, but many of them have had little experience with such collaborations; (3) were familiar with teacher research, were interested in becoming teacher researchers, and found their practices influenced by teacher research; (4) agree that book clubs were a valuable form of pedagogy, but most have not had such experiences themselves and fewer still have had experiences with book clubs in which multicultural literature was read; (5) had knowledge, experience, and interest in portfolio assessment, but did not agree that portfolios should replace other forms of assessment; and (6) found intrinsic indicators of motivation to be more meaningful than extrinsic indicators. (Contains 118 references. An appendix presents 23 tables of data.) (Author/RS)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: National Reading Research Center, Athens, GA.; National Reading Research Center, College Park, MD.