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ERIC Number: ED403811
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995
Pages: 143
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-1-878380-70-2
ISSN: ISSN-0884-0040
Models for Improving College Teaching: A Faculty Resource. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 6, 1995.
Travis, Jon E.
This report presents a collection of teaching models to help college faculty improve their teaching. Six categories of teaching models are presented: (1) assessment and feedback models, including the Classroom Assessment model created by Angelo and Cross and already widely used among community college faculty; (2) discussion and sharing models, such as the Great Teachers Seminar, which provide faculty with an event and an environment especially conducive to sharing ideas among colleagues; (3) dissemination models, which dispense an extensive assortment of ideas to large audiences of faculty; (4) clinical development models, such as the Instructional Skills Workshop, which uses a laboratory setting common to teacher preparation programs; (5) teaching and learning models, such as Anderson's Adaptive Control of Thinking model, which describes the learning process and presents specific procedures to facilitate specific learning types; and (6) instructional planning models, such as Gagne's Instructional Event Design, that can help the faculty member through the process of course and lesson planning. Three appendixes provide teaching resource lists and sample questions using classification systems. (Contains approximately 240 references.) (MDM)
ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education, One Dupont Circle, N.W., Suite 630, Washington, DC 20036-1183 ($18 plus $3.75 postage).
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom; ERIC Publications
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Association for the Study of Higher Education.; ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education, Washington, DC.; George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Graduate School of Education and Human Development.
Note: For a digest of this report, see HE 029 855.