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ERIC Number: ED402256
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1996
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teaching Economic Citizenship.
Messick, Richard E.
Because most countries in the western hemisphere have rejected authoritarian governments and economic policies for more democratic governments and freer economies, schools have a responsibility to help maintain democracy by teaching their students to take an active role in deciding both their political and economic futures. Healthy democracies demand students, who as adult citizens, understand, assert, and take responsibility for their fundamental political and economic rights. However, it is uncommon for students to learn about citizenship in terms of economic rights--the freedom to hold property, to earn a living and form associations, to operate a business, to invest one's earnings, to trade internationally, and to participate in the market economy. Traditionally, when it comes to the economy mainly abstract theoretical concepts (flow of money, goods, and services, supply and demand) are taught. Often lacking theoretical inclinations, students understand economic concerns better in terms of how to get jobs or how to borrow enough money to buy vehicles or other things they need. Wage and property concerns such as these can be used by teachers to educate students about the economic dimension of citizenship--the choices and limitations each individual has for participating in economic life as an individual and through trade unions, cooperatives, corporations, and other voluntary associations. Specific learning activities and classroom techniques for enhancing economic citizenship education are proposed in the following sections of the paper: "The Individual and the Market Economy"; "Economic Rights and Economic Freedom"; "The Conditions Required for Citizens to Exercise their Economic Rights"; and "Evaluating Economic Freedom." (CB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Freedom House, Washington, DC.
Note: Paper presented at the CIVITAS Panamericano Conference (Buenos Aires, Argentina, October 1996).