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ERIC Number: ED401549
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1996
Pages: 31
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Four Children, Four Stories of School and Literacy: Ani, Caitlin, Ira, and Mark. Report Series 2.27.
McGill-Franzen, Anne; And Others
A longitudinal study documented the classroom experiences of 4 case study children from preschool through grade 2. The children studied were thought to be at-risk: Ani, a profoundly deaf child of hearing parents; Mark, a child of an immigrant family struggling to learn their way in a strange culture and language; and Caitlin and Ira, African-American children whose families are economically disadvantaged. On average, a day each month was spent observing the children in class. Parents and teachers were interviewed about the ways children experienced literature in their everyday school and home lives. Ani and Ira exhibit contrasting histories--Ani was the first of the 4 children to learn to read, while Ira continued to struggle in an impoverished urban school setting. Caitlin's story is one of academic success due in large part to her mother's sacrifices and continued high expectations. Mark was successfully bilingual at home and appeared to successfully learn language skills through first grade. Mark began to experience failure, however, as he entered classrooms that focused on isolated skills acquisition and deficit approaches. Findings suggest that assessing the impact of an instructional program should take into account the beliefs and assumptions that accompany the implementation of the program, the quality of the activities, and the opportunities that children have to construct personal meaning as a result of those activities. (Contains a table of data and 5 figures illustrating student work.) (RS)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: National Research Center on English Learning and Achievement, Albany, NY.