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ERIC Number: ED401085
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1996
Pages: 598
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-0-8020-7858-3
ISSN: N/A
Shingwauk's Vision: A History of Native Residential Schools.
Miller, J. R.
This book provides an overview of the history of Native residential schools in Canada as one facet of the more general history of relations between that country's indigenous and immigrant peoples. It surveys the origins and evolution of residential schooling from the first forays in early 17th-century New France, through the colonial period, to the creation of the modern residential schools in the 1880s, and finally, to the phasing out of government-sponsored schools in the 1960s. Based on government and church archives and on the testimony of former students, this book provides a broad treatment of the motives of all three agents in the residential school story: Native peoples, government, and missionaries. It also examines the details of the boarding school experience, including academic and vocational instruction, missionary and government attitudes toward Native peoples and the goal of assimilation, gender issues for students and staff, work and recreation, care and abuse, and resistance to negative aspects of schooling by students and their families. Framing the book is the story of Shingwauk's vision of a "teaching wigwam" that would teach his people the European ways that they needed to adapt and thrive in the coming age. In the early and mid-19th century, Ojibwa Chief Shingwaukonce (Little Pine) and his son Augustine Shingwauk met with missionaries and government leaders and traveled widely to promote this vision. A residential school named for Shingwauk was opened near Sault Ste. Marie in 1873 and continued to operate as a residential school until 1971, when it became Algoma University College. In this school and others like it, Shingwauk's vision became an Aboriginal nightmare of forced assimilation and cultural genocide. The book includes end-notes; an explanation of sources, methodology, and nomenclature; an extensive bibliography; an index; and many photographs. (SV)
University of Toronto Press, 250 Sonwil Drive, Buffalo, NY 14225-5516 (cloth: ISBN-0-8020-0833-X, $70; paper: ISBN-0-8020-7858-3, $29.95).
Publication Type: Books; Historical Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Canada