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ERIC Number: ED401046
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1996-Oct
Pages: 55
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Helping your Child Succeed in School with Activities for Children Aged 5 through 11.
Rich, Dorothy
Parents can play a key role in attaining the United States' National Education Goals, a main component of which is that all children will be ready to learn when they enter school. This guide for parents provides basic information on factors related to school success and a series of activities that parents can do with their children, ages 5 through 11, to help them succeed in school. Part 1 of the guide serves as an introduction. Part 2, "The Basics," addresses learning at home, in the community, and at school, and emphasizes the importance of starting early, communicating with children, handling children's homework, connecting with the community, and being involved at school. How children learn and what children learn from parents are also addressed. The importance of both active and quiet learning, limiting television viewing, and encouraging active learning are emphasized. The guide then lists important messages for parents to convey to their children about school success: (1) sharing one's own experiences and goals; (2) establishing realistic, consistent family rules; and (3) encouraging children to think about the future. Part 3 of the guide, "Activities," comprises the bulk of the guide, and contains parent-child activities arranged by approximate child age levels. Each activity lists its goal, benefits to children, materials needed, and step-by-step instructions. Part 4 of the guide, "Parents and the Schools," explains when parents should talk with teachers, gives recommendations for parent-teacher conferences, and makes suggestions for volunteering. Contains 20 references. (KDFB)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Parents
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.