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ERIC Number: ED400616
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1996
Pages: 48
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Lessons for School-Based Reform.
McCollum, Heather
Beginning in 1990, the United States and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) conducted an international, 14-nation study of programs for at-risk children. This report presents findings from the second year of the study, during which the Planning and Evaluation Service of the U.S. Department of Education reviewed the following five programs: The Accelerated Schools Project, Success for All, the School Development Program, school-based management projects, and the Higher Order Thinking Skills Program (HOTS). The study investigated several important dimensions of reform, including model adoption and implementation, leadership and staff development, resources, curriculum and instruction, and parent involvement. Data were gathered from interviews and observations conducted at site visits made during spring 1992. Each section of the report begins with an overview of the theoretical foundation of the program, a summary of specific program components, and brief descriptions of the study sites. Highlights of the findings include the following: (1) the broader the scope of the intervention, the more program implementation depended on context rather than content; (2) time, rather than money, was the scarcest resource for most of the programs; (3) although program sponsors were very aware of the need for improved staff development, professional-development opportunities that contributed to teachers' intellectual growth were still the exception rather than the rule; (4) involving parents was often extremely challenging, even when reforms offered them decision-making roles; (5) governance-based reforms may generate legitimate outcomes that have no direct relationship to students, such as improved teacher work-lives; (6) interesting and challenging instruction geared toward higher order thinking skills were still quite rare in classrooms; and (7) even with the most successful reform initiative, connections to other social services may be essential. (LMI)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Department of Education, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Policy Studies Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.