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ERIC Number: ED399593
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1996-Mar
Pages: 24
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Exploratory Study of Children's Task Groups: Instructional Implications.
Keyton, Joann; Dodson, Nancy L.
Despite the increasing popularity of cooperative learning techniques in elementary instruction, many educators believe that children do not possess effective group interaction skills and advocate that children be taught the group communication skills necessary for group interaction as a separate instructional component. Unfortunately, communication researchers have provided little leadership in this area. A pilot study examined the impact of two instructional modes on children's ability to use effective group interaction skills. All children in a fourth-fifth grade classroom participated in one of six groups that were exposed to three different experimental conditions (lecture and video about group communication processes, lecture only, or no instruction). The task for each group was to pick a period of history, plan a presentation for the class, and plan a 2-page written report. Results indicated that (1) students appeared to like and appreciate the instruction about group communication processes; (2) children could identify communication processes associated with their group task; (3) children appeared eager for this type of instruction and appeared able to implement it in their group interactions; (4) instruction on group interaction must include effective monitoring; and (5) while instruction in group communication skills is needed for children, in-service instruction about group communication is also needed for elementary instructors. Findings suggest that children do have the capability of using interaction skills that promote effective group interaction. (Contains 25 references and 3 tables of data. An appendix lists the instructional elements of the lecture.) (RS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A