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ERIC Number: ED388304
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994
Pages: 7
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A User-Adaptive Interface for Computer Assisted Language Learning.
Wilson, Eve
Computer assisted language learning (CALL) packages offer the majority of students who are learning English as a foreign language the opportunity for individual instruction. To meet the needs of an individual student, an adaptive CALL environment must have a dynamic model of student performance, a means of varying the difficulty of the learning task, and a mapping between student competence and task complexity. There are two main types of user-adaptive interfaces for language learning: discrete-step interfaces and continuously variable interfaces. Before designers can build CALL systems that "understand" their users, they must be able to analyze the interactions between the user and the computer in the language learning task. Language learning skills may be divided into the categories of lexical skills, syntactical skills and discourse skills. The first task in recording and measuring student performance is to devise a user profile; the second task is to ensure a continuum of exercises. Once the student has decided what linguistic skill to work on, there are four stages to the exercise generation process: (1) determining a suitable source; (2) choosing suitable passages; (3) selecting from these passages examples most suited to user needs; and (4) generating the electronic version of the exercise. The format of the exercise used in this study was found to be generally effective; however it is unclear to what degree there is a correlation between readability grade and exercise difficulty. (AEF)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: In: Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 1994. Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 94--World Conference on Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, June 25-30, 1994); see IR 017 359.