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ERIC Number: ED387909
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995-Oct
Pages: 54
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Alternative Career Formation Perspectives: Lessons for Educational Leadership from Law, Medicine, and Training for the Priesthood.
Daresh, John C.; Playko, Marsha A.
One of the suggestions for improving the professional development of school leaders is to adopt some of the practices used in other professional fields. This paper explores three models of professional development traditionally followed in medicine, law, and the Catholic priesthood to assess the extent to which these approaches are likely to improve the preparation of aspiring school administrators. A review of literature for the following areas is presented first: the needs of beginning principals; the nature of ongoing professional development for educational administrators; preparation programs for other professions; and sociological analyses of professional occupations. A conclusion is that the medical, legal, and priestly models share the following characteristics: focus, selectivity, commitment, and intensity. Each of the models is directed toward a clear focus and well-identified roles, and each exercises great selectivity in terms of student selection and retention, clinical sites, faculty selection, and program assessment. Each requires new members to make public statements of personal commitment and to engage in a full-time, intensive pursuit of the profession. The paper does not advocate the wholesale adoption of one professional-preparation model, but instead proposes that educational administration be thought of as a profession. And, if it is a profession, is school leadership really valued as a way to improve the effectiveness of schools? Appendices contain examples of a law-school and a medical-school plan of studies. Two figures are included. (Contains 84 references.) (LMI)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers; Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the University Council for Educational Administration (Salt Lake City, UT, October 1995).