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ERIC Number: ED387644
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1995
Pages: 7
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Education for All Aspects of the Industry.
Bailey, Thomas; And Others
Centerfocus, n9 Fall 1995
Education for all aspects of the industry (AAI) is a strategy that is being advocated by education reformers to combine learning and experience, integrate vocational and academic education, develop more interdisciplinary instruction, and forge more links between schools, business, and the community. A study examined AAI from the perspective of the workplace, focusing on the interaction between postsecondary programs and the industries that employ their graduates. The objective of the research was to assess the extent to which education reform might promote new types of work organization or be slowed down by a perception on the part of educators that firms do not want these new types of skills. For this study, the printing industry and the fashion apparel industry, both fast-changing areas, were studied. The study found that, although the perception that broader knowledge and skills are advantageous for the emerging workplace is one of the key justifications for AAI, demand for workers with the skills learned in AAI programs is mixed. The development of AAI may be caught in a vicious circle in which employers are not interested because their labor force is not appropriately trained, and schools have no incentive to implement AAI because they perceive no demand from employers. However, the study concluded that the AAI strategy may still be justified on the basis of its pedagogic benefits and its effect on the ability of students to negotiate an increasingly fluid and uncertain labor market. (KC)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Collected Works - Serials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, Berkeley, CA.
Note: For the full report from which this synthesis was drawn, see ED 377 328.