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ERIC Number: ED381092
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994-Oct
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Survey of the Impressions of Economics Departments of the Quantitative Courses Required of Economics Majors.
Young, Victoria E.; Nelson, C. Van
A survey of chairpersons of the Departments of Economics at 47 accredited U.S. colleges and universities collected data concerning required and recommended courses, departments in which students take the courses, satisfaction with the courses, and problems in those courses where respondents indicated dissatisfaction. Results indicated that: (1) the quantitative course most often required of economics majors is statistics, with 98 percent of institutions requiring it; (2) calculus was required at almost two-thirds of institutions and linear algebra at one-fourth; (3) statistics was taught in economics departments 43 percent of the time and in mathematics departments 35 percent of the time, while calculus and linear algebra were taught in mathematics departments almost 90 percent of the time; (4) respondents were more satisfied with quantitative courses not taken in mathematics/computer science departments; (5) in private institutions, 94 percent of computer programming and 80 percent of computer tool courses were taught in mathematics/computer science departments, while in public institutions, percentages were 50 and 33 percent respectively; and (6) the most frequently cited area of dissatisfaction was the lack of theoretical applications. The paper concludes that quantitative courses should stay in the mathematics and computer science departments, and instructors from these departments should include more problems applying quantitative skills to the economics field. (JDD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Mid-Western Educational Research Association (Chicago, IL, October 12-15, 1994).