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ERIC Number: ED380914
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1993-Apr
Pages: 45
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Human Capital and Structural Explanations of Post-School Success for Youth with Disabilities: A Latent Variable Exploration of the National Longitudinal Transition Study.
Blackorby, Jose; And Others
This paper explores the transition from school to young adulthood of youth with disabilities from the first wave (n=939) of the National Longitudinal Transition Study (NLTS). Two popular sociological perspectives which explain the postschool success of youth with disabilities were examined: human capital in the form of education and training, and structural factors such as family and community background. Seven latent constructs were identified as generally representing either of the conceptual orientations, their combination, or postschool success and were reflected in a number of measured variables. These seven constructs include: Community Thrive, Family Thrive, School Thrive, School Programs, Academic Difficulty, Individual Aptitude, and Postschool Success. Results suggested that both structural and human capital constructs significantly relate to postschool success. However, the relative importance of the two types of factors varied by disability. For example, Family Thrive related to all disability groups similarly with the exception of mental retardation, while School Programs generally favored youth with learning disabilities and sensory impairments. An appendix offers background information on the NLTS sample. (Contains approximately 80 references.) (JDD)
SRI International, Room BS 178, 333 Ravenswood Ave., Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493 ($10).
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Special Education Programs (ED/OSERS), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: SRI International, Menlo Park, CA.
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: National Longitudinal Transition Study of Special Education Students