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ERIC Number: ED379638
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1995-Apr
Pages: 106
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Sex-Role Stereotypes in Children's Literature and Their Effect on Reading Comprehension.
Rosen, Joy K.
A study focused on whether literary character sex role stereotyping in children's literature had a negative or positive effect on reading comprehension. It was hypothesized that no significant differences exist in the comprehension of a mixed gender population when reading about characters in non-traditional sex roles. It was further hypothesized that no significant difference would exist in comprehension when males and females were analyzed separately. The sample included 20 male and 20 female below average children enrolled in a typical New York City public school. The children, who ranged in age from 8.5 to 9.3 years, were of either Black or Hispanic origin and of low socioeconomic backgrounds, read a total of 12 stories. Six selections portrayed male and female characters in traditional occupational roles. The other six selections portrayed male and female characters in non-traditional occupational roles. Results indicated that: (1) there was a significant difference in comprehension for the mixed gender population when reading about characters in non-traditional sex roles as opposed to characters portrayed in traditional sex roles; (2) the same results were true for the male population; but (3) the results for the female population supported the hypothesis of no significant difference in comprehension. (Contains 37 references and 3 tables of data. Appendixes present the reading selections and questions, and a data list.) (RS)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A