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ERIC Number: ED379051
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1994-Sep
Pages: 93
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Enrolled Students' Evaluation of Miami-Dade Community College Educational Goals. Research Report #94-12R.
Fisher, Sylvia K.
In winter 1994, a study was conducted at Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC), in Florida, to determine students' perceptions of the college's educational goals. Surveys were distributed to students in 200 courses, representing 5% of all classes offered in the term. Using a 5-point scale, students were asked to rate both the importance of 20 educational goals frequently pursued by higher education institutions and their level of satisfaction with M-DCC's attainment of those goals. Surveys were returned from 168 classes for a final sample of 1, 476 student responses. Study findings, based on averaged student ratings, included the following: (1) college-wide, 19 of the 20 goals received ratings above 4.0 in terms of their importance; (2) the five most important goals were maintain high academic quality, prepare students to communicate effectively, maintain an excellent reputation, prepare students for a career upon graduation, and provide students with the opportunity to become broadly educated; (3) over 60% of students agreed that M-DCC addressed these top five goals; (4) no goal item received a disagreement rating of 20% or more; (5) over 83% (n=982) of students were either somewhat or very satisfied with their Miami-Dade experience; (6) students at all sites generally expressed satisfaction for goals related to academic quality; and (7) at the InterAmerican Center instructional site, however, at least 20% of respondents disagreed that M-DCC fulfilled 11 of the 20 goals. (Tables of responses college-wide and by campus and the survey instrument are included.) (KP)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL. Office of Institutional Research.