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ERIC Number: ED377908
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1995-Jan
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Developmental Placement and Academic Progress: Tracking "At-Risk" Students in the 1990 Entering Cohort. Enrollment Analysis EA95-2.
Boughan, Karl
In an effort to determine which factors most consistently identified incoming at-risk students, Prince George's Community College (PGCC), in Maryland, conducted a longitudinal study of fall 1990 entering freshmen without previous college experience. After dividing the cohort into at-risk categories (e.g., age, study load, racial background, socio-economic status, etc.) and following students' academic progress for 4 years, it was determined that results on pre-registration developmental placement tests was the most efficient method for identifying at-risk students. Analyses of other results for the 1990 cohort indicated the following: (1) only 61% enrolled beyond the first two semesters; (2) 59% exited without any recognizable academic accomplishment, such as transfer or a formal degree or certificate, after 4 years, compared to 23% who exited with some accomplishment; (3) the biggest factor in the college's low retention rate was the high proportion of college-unprepared enrollees, with 59% needing remediation on one of three placement tests; (4) students requiring remedial math work faced the greatest chance of failure; (5) only 15% of developmental students completed all required remedial programs, while the chance for academic success for these 15% was almost equal to non-developmental students; and (6) a full-time study load and attendance during all 3 initial semesters increased student chances of completing remedial programs. Data tables and recommendations for improving academic success rates are included. (KP)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Prince George's Community Coll., Largo, MD. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.