NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED377898
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1993-Dec
Pages: 64
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Enhancing the Academic Skills of Adolescent Students with Learning Disabilities through Computer-Assisted Instruction.
Wilson, Lex
A study was conducted at the Cumberland Campus of Nova Scotia Community College to determine the effect of a computer-based learning system on the academic and personal growth of adolescents with learning disabilities. Eleven learning disabled students, with an average age of 16.1 years, and one observer were chosen to participate in an 8-week summer program utilizing the INVEST integrated learning system, a networked system of basic instructional software offering lessons in reading, writing, mathematics, and life skills. Results of the study, based on pre- and post-standardized tests and feedback from participants, parents, and the observer, included the following: (1) positive gains were registered in both reading and math, with the group's average reading score moving from below average (29th percentile) to average (40th percentile) and average mathematics score moving from the 32nd to the 49th percentile; (2) improvement in mathematics was more in numerical operations than in reasoning; (3) 70% of the participants thought that the computer approach was better than traditional high school courses, and 80% indicated that they had learned more than with traditional methods; (4) the instructor indicated that the system accommodated a wider range of learner levels than traditional curricula; and (5) parents of the participants reported positive changes in attitudes toward school work. Contains 16 references. Tables, graphs, and the questionnaires are appended. (KP)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Nova Scotia Community Coll., Springhill. Cumberland Campus.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Canada