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ERIC Number: ED377797
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1994-Dec
Pages: 32
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-0-88799-298-6
ISSN: ISSN-1201-0502
Returns to Investment in Ontario University Education, 1960-1990, and Implications for Tuition Fee Policy. Discussion Series, Issue 5.
Stager, David A. A.
This analysis of Ontario's returns to investment and implications for tuition fee policy updates a 1989 publication titled "Focus on Fees." The paper examines: data on public and private return on investment (ROI) from university education, pattern of ROI rates over time, and impact of tuition fee levels on estimated ROI for various university programs. Variations for males and females and for different programs of study are reported. ROI was estimated using earnings data from Canada's 1991 population census. Results indicate that: (1) private ROI for male graduates in humanities and social, biological, and physical sciences range from 7 to 15 percent; 15 to 16 percent in law, engineering, and commerce; and almost 21 percent for medicine; (2) private returns for women are higher than for men, with the exception of medicine; (3) the decline in returns to higher education investment in the 1970s was a cyclical condition rather than the beginning of a long-term trend, as rates increased in the 1980s. The paper concludes that tuition fees could be increased substantially before a declining rate of return could be expected to have an effect on enrollment, and there could be a greater differentiation of tuition fees by program. Appendixes discuss data sources, study assumptions, and sensitivity of estimated returns to assumptions. (Contains 22 references.) (JDD)
Council of Ontario Universities, 444 Yonge St., Suite 203, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2H4 Canada.
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.
Identifiers - Location: Canada