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ERIC Number: ED376510
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994-Mar-17
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
How Sassy Are Grrrl Zines?
Livingston-Webber, Joan
According to Lawrence Chua, "zines" are "xeroxed broadsides" which "make marginality their starting point, empowering voices excluded from the slicker journals." According to "Ms," they are "downsized stapled rags...often defiantly tasteless." A subgenre of zines, "Grrrl zines" are those written, produced, and distributed by young women, usually those of the 20-something generation and younger. Swearing, obscenities, scandalous, provocative language are important elements in the arsenal the grrrl zines throw at the mainstream window from their fringe. Their statements of purpose say, in essence, that they exist to give young women a voice, to find others, to build community, to reassure and be reassured. Exhorting women to "do something?" is an element of almost all the grrrl zines. Feminist in their orientation, zines are very critical of mainstream magazines such as "Sassy," which they maintain are not sassy at all but sexist and oppressive in their ideas about who women should be. Of Sassy, "Riot Grrrl NYC" writes, "their format of visuals is the same as all other magazines with a female audience--thin, very attractive models." It is a genre that empowers, but the possibility of incorporating it into writing courses is limited because it is too forceful and intense for the classroom. To tame its conventions would be to coopt its intensity and power. (Contains a selective list of zines and sources for zines.) (TB)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (45th, Nashville, TN, March 16-19, 1994). Project supported in part by a grant from the University of Nebraska at Omaha Committee on Research.