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ERIC Number: ED375299
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994-Mar
Pages: 44
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Student Retention: Creating Student Success. Monograph Number Two.
Tracy-Mumford, Fran; And Others
Effective student retention strategies involve creating a vision and committing to that vision, ensuring that processes are applied systematically, providing support, and offering high quality instruction. Creating an effective program means having a real sense of what "program completion" is, how the state and programs define and measure retention, and how the program is organized and operated to achieve better retention rates. Effective student support strategies are as follows: display respect and build rapport; counsel students; establish trust between instructor and student; help students develop effective coping strategies; refer students to agencies/services for nonacademic needs; and build on family support. High quality instruction ensures that students succeed by providing them with opportunities for continual success, tangible evidence of progress, relevant instruction, support in class/tutoring sessions to develop program affiliation and rapport with instructors and students, and involvement in setting program goals. Structural areas influencing retention include recruitment, orientation, assessment and placement, student recognition and activities, student evaluation, student contact system, instructional delivery system, support system, and qualified personnel. (Contains 58 references and appendixes which include a table identifying state retention rates and a chart that shows state formulas/measures and definitions/descriptions.) (YLB)
National Adult Education Professional Development Consortium, Inc., 444 North Capitol Street, N.W., Suite 422, Washington, DC 20001 ($15; quantity price $12.75).
Publication Type: Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Adult Education Professional Development Consortium, Washington, DC.