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ERIC Number: ED375162
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1994
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Statement of Principles on Assessment in Mathematics and Science Education.
Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Programs for the Improvement of Practice.; National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.
Assessment is an integral part of the systemic reform of the educational process. This pamphlet seeks to reflect a vision for student assessment that will engage students, teachers, parents, policymakers, and the public in progress toward attainment of the National Educational Goal of U.S. students being the first in the world in science and mathematics achievement by the year 2000. Assessment should begin with identifying the purpose and context in which the assessment is to be used, type of information sought and the use to which the information will be put and should be aligned with rigorous and challenging content standards of what students should know and be able to do. Many different methods should be used to ensure that all students have the opportunity to be challenged by assessment. Teachers must be actively involved in the entire assessment process. The community must understand the assessment process and be aware of assessment results. State, national, and international aspects of assessment are discussed. The three central issues at any level are: (1) what students should learn, (2) how they should be taught, and (3) how progress should be measured. An effective assessment should provide information that can be used to improve students' access to mathematical and scientific knowledge and to help each student prepare to function effectively in today's society. (Contains 7 references.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Programs for the Improvement of Practice.; National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.