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ERIC Number: ED374880
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1994
Pages: 32
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
First Academic Year Progress of Summer 1993 High-Risk Students in the Fresh Start Program as Compared to Similar Students Who Entered Gainesville College during the Fall of 1990.
Hamilton, John M.
The Fresh Start (FS) program was initiated at Gainesville College (GC), in Georgia, to target at-risk students and improve their overall academic performance and retention. The program provides immediate placement of students into remedial classes, academic support services, intrusive counseling, and long-term computerized tracking to assess student outcomes. A study was conducted to track academic outcomes for one academic year and determine any differences for the 68 FS students who entered in summer 1993 and 233 similarly at-risk students who started in fall 1990. Results of the analysis included the following: (1) while the two sample groups were similar for most characteristics, 50% of the 1990 sample were female, compared to 59% of the FS sample; (2) the FS group had more remedial education needs upon entering than the 1990 sample; (3) after one year, the FS students had an average grade point average of 2.22, compared to 1.70 for the 1990 students, while 19% (n=13) of the FS and 21% (n=49) of the 1990 group were candidates for academic probation; (4) 79% of the 1990 group returned for the subsequent quarter, while 69% of the FS students did; and (5) for both groups, less than 7% of the students who attempted academic credit courses received "A's," overall pass rates in the humanities were 11% better for FS students than the 1990 group. The results suggested that the FS program, as implemented, resulted in overall better academic outcomes for at-risk students. (KP)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
What Works Clearinghouse Reviewed: Does Not Meet Evidence Standards