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ERIC Number: ED373010
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993
Pages: 28
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Measuring Student Performance: Assessment in the Social Studies. Theme Issue.
Kiernan, Henry, Ed.; Pyne, John, Ed.
The Docket: Journal of the New Jersey Council for the Social Studies, Win 1993
The four articles in this theme issue provide an overview of assessment in the social studies and the rationale behind the movement for a more authentic assessment of learning outcomes. In the first article, "Thinking as an Unnatural Act," William T. Daly offers a clear rationale for social studies teachers to re-examine the methods of assessing student performance. In the second article, "Authentic Assessment in Social Studies," Jack L. Nelson conveys why standardized testing does not measure effectively skills taught in social studies and presents a strong case for social studies teachers to demand more authentic assessment approaches aimed at developing students' critical thinking, ethical decision-making, and the refinement of conceptual ideas. Pat Nickell in the third article, "Performance Assessment in Principle and Practice," offers guidance for developing performance tasks for classroom use and gives several examples. In the final article, "Performance Assessment in Social Studies: What CRESST Research Tells Us," Pam Aschbacher and David Niemi review present initiatives to emphasize deepening understanding, higher order thinking skills, and more authentic assessments of student outcomes in the social studies. They explore the research-based premises about developing performance assessments and provide examples of how to employ assessment tasks to improve instruction. (CK)
The Docket, New Jersey Council for the Social Studies, P.O. Bos 4155, River Edge, NJ 07661.
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Collected Works - Serials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: New Jersey Council for the Social Studies.