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ERIC Number: ED371287
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Aug-22
Pages: 30
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Campus Sexual Harassment and Departmental Climate.
Bond, Meg A.; And Others
Relationships among campus psychological climate, gender ratios, and incidence of sexual harassment were investigated to determine whether harassment within an institution could be related to the psychological climate of individual departments and to the gender ratios of women to men students, faculty, and full professors. Gender harassment, such as suggestive classroom joking or sex role stereotyping of students by the instructor, is not necessarily intended to elicit sexual cooperation but conveys sexist attitudes. Sexualized harassment, by contrast, includes more coercive forms of sexual advances. A 32-item questionnaire concerning sexual harassment was mailed to 10,500 students in a public university in the Northeast. Gender harassment occurred more frequently in departments where faculty hold gender-based expectations of students and decreased as percentages of women increased. It was negatively correlated with support for women's professional development and with general respect for students. Respectful faculty behaviors such as complimenting students and being sensitive to outside family obligations characterize departments with less harassment. Harassment is influenced by the climate of the student's major department which either tolerates or discourages it by virtue of group norms or values. The climate of the major department is influenced by the culture of the larger institution. Because of the difficulties of obtaining an adequate sample, the relationship between sexualized harassment and climate factors was impossible to determine. (MSF)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (101st, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, August 20-24, 1993).