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ERIC Number: ED369491
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1993
Pages: 6
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Starting Solids: A Guide for Parents and Child Care Providers.
National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates and Practitioners, Cherry Hill, NJ.; International Food Informational Council Foundation, Washington, DC.
Most infants consume only breast milk or infant formula for the first 4 months, as their digestive systems and jaw and throat muscles are not ready for solid foods. Most healthcare professionals advise starting solid foods between 4 and 6 months of age, when infants can hold their heads up straight when sitting. The first solid food should be single-grain, iron-fortified baby cereal. After the first week, babies eat about four tablespoons of cereal mixed with four tablespoons of liquid twice daily, though babies' appetites can vary day to day. Between 6 and 8 months, other foods can be tried, with one new food introduced every few days to allow the child's system to adjust and to watch for unusual reactions. Single strained or pureed orange vegetables (e.g., squash) should be tried first, followed by green vegetables, and fruits. A baby's stool may change color upon eating new foods, but a skin rash, diarrhea, vomiting, or stuffy nose may be signs of a food allergy. Between 9 and 12 months, lumpy or chopped foods, such as vegetables, strained meats, or cottage cheese, may be introduced. By 1 year, most babies eat small, tender table foods, and cow's milk can be introduced. By 18 months, children are eating most solid foods. This pamphlet includes step-by-step instructions on first aid for a choking infant. (AC)
National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates and Practitioners, 1101 Kings Highway North, Suite 206, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034-1931.
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Parents; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates and Practitioners, Cherry Hill, NJ.; International Food Informational Council Foundation, Washington, DC.