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ERIC Number: ED369346
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994-Feb-22
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Remarks by the President to American Council on Education.
Clinton, William
Changes in society and the economy require significant changes in American educational institutions. A seven-point agenda for fostering lifetime learning includes (1) helping every child begin school healthy and ready to learn; (2) setting and achieving world-class standards in public education; (3) opening the doors of college opportunity to every young American eager and able to do college work; (4) expanding opportunities for youth to serve their communities and their country while earning money for their education through national service; (5) providing new learning opportunities for young people who are going from high school to work; (6) changing our unemployment system into a reemployment system; and (7) challenging every sector of society to accept greater responsibility for achieving an environment of lifelong learning. All advanced nations are facing a crisis of jobs and income and need to develop means to continue to create new jobs and increase income. In the United States data indicate that education, for those to obtain it, can go a long way to solving this problem. In order for the lifelong learning vision to work, a new ethic of education must grip the American imagination and the country must support various administration initiatives including Goals 2000 legislation, the Safe and Drug Free Schools Initiative, the new direct lending student loan program, the strengthened Pell grant program, and the Americorps National Health Service Program. (JB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC.
Note: Speech presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Council on Education (Washington, DC, February 22, 1994).