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ERIC Number: ED358940
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Mar
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Can Neuromotor Functioning Predict Stanford-Binet IQ Scores and Piagetian Cognitive Task Performance?
Tomes, Ruth; Heilbuth, Lynne
Studies comparing neuromotor and mental functioning of normal and disabled populations have shown that lower cognitive functioning is significantly related to lower motor functioning for retarded or disabled children but not for normal children. In an effort to further examine the relationship between these two functions, a study was conducted of 18 five-year-old boys, 18 five-year-old girls, 21 seven-year-old boys, and 15 seven-year-old girls. Four tests were administered to the participants: the McCarron Assessment of Neuromuscular Development (MAND) to evaluate neuromotor functioning; the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale: Fourth Edition (SB:FE) to obtain intelligence quotient (IQ) scores; and the Nebraska-Wisconsin Cognitive Assessment Battery (NEWCAB) to measure preoperations to formal operations in relations tasks, classification tasks, and number/length tasks. Correlational and simple regression analyses were run on the test scores to determine the predictability of cognitive outcomes from neuromotor results. Study findings included the following: (1) significant correlations were found between the neurodevelopment index of the MAND and the SB:FE composite IQ, and between the four SB:FE area scores and the NEWCAB total score; (2) specific sections of the MAND which predicted the IQ score were the kinesthetic integration, persistent control, and bimanual dexterity; and (3) the neurodevelopment index accounted for a considerably greater amount of variance in quantitative reasoning for 5-year-olds (31%) than for 7-year-olds (15%), but for less variance in short-term memory for 5-year-olds (17%) than for 7-year-olds (22%). Detailed tables of findings are attached. (AC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (60th, New Orleans, LA, March 25-28, 1993).