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ERIC Number: ED358856
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1992
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Introduction to Multimedia in Instruction. An IAT Technology Primer.
Oblinger, Diana
Multimedia allows computing to move from text and data into the realm of graphics, sound, images, and full-motion video, thus allowing both students and teachers to use the power of computers in new ways. Key elements of multimedia are natural presentation of information and non-linear navigation through applications for access to information on demand. Multimedia can be thought of as using the computer to provide a multisensory experience. Non-linear navigation is often termed hypermedia, the ability to move through information non-sequentially. Efficiency and effectiveness are reasons for using multimedia in instruction. This paper reviews numerous benefits of multimedia as well as various situations in which its use is appropriate, types of multimedia applications, ways of producing multimedia lessons, and strategies for using multimedia. Effective multimedia use in higher education depends on a faculty leader to provide vision and mediate a departmental connection, an administrative leader, and a computer support leader. To meet the multimedia development needs of educators, International Business Machines (IBM) has created the Advanced Academic System (AAcS), a personal computer preloaded with multimedia hardware, productivity software, and exclusive multimedia software. Applications such as the AAcS hold great promise in education and can be applied to virtually any subject matter. Appendix A lists CD-ROM, laserdisc, and video suppliers. Appendix B lists associations involved in multimedia development and related activities. (Contains 8 references.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: International Business Machines Corp., New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill. Inst. for Academic Technology.