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ERIC Number: ED358614
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992
Pages: 53
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Moving On...Transition from Child-Centered to Adult Health Care for Youth with Disabilities.
Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Maternal and Child Health and Resources Development.
This document contains information about the medical transition of youth with disabilities from child-centered to adult health care. The generic characteristics and needs of young people with long-term illnesses and disabilities are especially emphasized. Guidance is provided for appropriate health care of the adolescent during the transition process, for the development of transition programs, and for the preparation of physicians who wish to provide health care for this population group. The document examines the benefits of transition to adult-based health services; reviews generic health needs such as guidance on nutrition and fitness, sexuality, substance use, psychosocial needs, self-care, and empowerment; providing services within the health care system; and adaptation of services. The report concludes that adolescents with chronic illness and disabilities must have a well-defined primary health care program, which covers the same areas of medical and psychosocial concern as programs for adolescents without disabilities. Appendixes discuss the Federal commitment in this area; examine the need for improved training of physicians; offer statistical tables of health, education, and employment data; list 37 references; and describe 15 information centers and programs. (JDD)
National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 2000 15th Street North, Suite 701, Arlington, VA 22201-2617.
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Maternal and Child Health and Resources Development.