NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED357850
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1993-Mar
Pages: 28
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Relationship of Self-Blame and Responsibility Attributions and Motivations, for Schoolwork and Conduct, to Self-Worth and Self-Perceptions.
Johnson, Eric A.
Focusing on failure experiences, two studies explored the attributions of self-blame and responsibility and the motivational patterns of avoidance and increased diligence in elementary and middle school students. In the first study, 298 third through sixth grade students and 396 sixth through eighth grade students completed a self-report questionnaire to describe their attributions, motivations, and feelings following scholastic failure and misbehavior. As part of the questionnaire, students performed sentence-completion tasks and then selected their affective response to scholastic failure and misconduct from the following affects: worried, depressed, ashamed, frustrated, mad at themselves, sad, mad at someone else, and shamed by someone else. In the second study, which used a simplified version of the original questionnaire, students were assigned to an attribution and motivation group based on their response to one question. Analysis revealed that students making self-blame attributions reported lower levels of self-worth, perceived scholastic competence, and hopefulness, and greater worry about school than subjects making responsibility attributions. Students with avoidant motivational orientations reported lower ratings of the importance of academic success, scholastic competence, and hopefulness and reported greater conditionality of their fathers' support than subjects who endorsed effortful motivational orientations. Similar patterns for attributions and motivations regarding behavioral conduct were found. (MM)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A