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ERIC Number: ED356186
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1993-Jun
Pages: 31
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Hostile Hallways: The AAUW Survey on Sexual Harassment in America's Schools.
Harris (Louis) and Associates, Inc., New York, NY.
This report presents the findings from a survey that was designed to a profile the problem of sexual harassment in U.S. public schools and to answer many of the questions about school-based harassment. More than 1,600 public school students in 79 schools across the continental United States in grades 8 through 11 (female and male, African American, White, and Hispanic) were surveyed. Students were instructed only to answer about their school-related experiences during school-related times (on the way to and from school, in classrooms and hallways, on school grounds during the day and after school, and on school trips). A list of 14 types of harassment, half involving physical contact and half involving no physical contact, was developed. Using the 14 types of sexual harassment, students were asked to respond to the following question: "During your whole school life, how often, if at all, has anyone (this includes students, teachers, other school employees, and anyone else) done the following things to you when you did not want them to?" The most significant finding of the survey was that 4 out of 5 students reported that they had been the target of some form of harassment during their school lives. Other major findings of the research included: nearly one in three girls (31%) who had been harassed have experienced unwanted advances "often," compared with fewer than one in five boys (18%); sexual comments, jokes, looks, and gestures, as well as touching, grabbing, and/or pinching in a sexual way, were commonplace in school; experiences of student-to-student harassment outnumbered all others, with notable gender and ethnic/racial gaps; adult-to-student harassment was nonetheless considerable, with notable gender and ethnic/racial gaps; public areas were the most common harassment sites, especially as reported by girls; notably higher numbers of girls than boys said they had suffered as a result of sexual harassment in school; and boys routinely experienced harassment, especially African American boys. (DB)
AAUW Sales Office, P.O. Box 251, Annapolis Junction, MD 20701-0251 ($8.95).
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers; Teachers; Practitioners; Administrators
Language: English
Sponsor: American Association of Univ. Women Educational Foundation, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Harris (Louis) and Associates, Inc., New York, NY.