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ERIC Number: ED356070
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1993-Mar
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Creative Thinking and Temperament as Predictors of School-Aged Children's Coping Abilities and Responses to Stress.
Carson, David K.; Bittner, Mark T.
This study examined the power of school-aged children's creative thinking and temperament to predict children's coping abilities as observed in the school setting. The study also examined children's typical responses to major and minor stressful life events. A total of 60 children between 9 and 12 years of age completed the verbal and figural portions of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Form A) and the Stress Impact Scale. An observational rating scale of coping behavior was also completed for each child by trained observers after extensive observations of children in the school environment over a period of several months. The Stress Response Scale and Middle Childhood Temperament Questionnaire were completed by mothers of the children. Results showed that age and four Torrance figural indicators of creative thinking (fluency, originality, elaboration, and resistance to premature closure) were associated with children's coping abilities. Resistance to premature closure was most strongly predictive of coping abilities. While the findings indicated a general lack of relationship between creative thinking and various characteristics of temperament, children's activity level was strongly associated with their level of creative thinking and use of effective coping skills. Dimensions of temperament most predictive of less difficult responses to stress and a lower perceived stress impact were rhythmicity (predictability) of behavior, positive mood, and adaptability to change. (Author/MM)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (60th, New Orleans, LA, March 25-28, 1993).