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ERIC Number: ED355711
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Aug
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Early Interaction Patterns and Later Communicative Performance of Deaf Infants.
Koester, Lynne Sanford; Spencer, Patricia E.
This study investigated associations between infants' prelinguistic communicative behaviors at 9 months and their communication and language performance at 12 and 18 months. The inclusion of both hearing (N=19) and deaf (N=16) infants in the study allowed identification of effects related to the receptive communication modality (vision versus audition) available to the infants. Findings indicated that, for both deaf and hearing infants, characteristics of interactive behaviors at 9 months (including signalling, rhythmic activity, and gaze aversion) are associated with later communicative behaviors. However, the presence or absence of ability to receive auditory communication resulted in similar early interactive behaviors being associated differently with communicative development of deaf and hearing infants. The study concludes that assumptions about "positive" or "negative" characteristics of infants' early interactive behaviors may result in misleading conclusions if infants' hearing status is not considered. Face-to-face and free play situations may be experienced differently and have different meanings for infants whose primary modality for receptive communication is vision instead of audition. (JDD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, Washington, DC.; Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Maternal and Child Health Services.; Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Gallaudet Research Inst., Washington, DC.
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (100th, Washington, DC, August 14-18, 1992).