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ERIC Number: ED355069
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1982-Mar
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0305-6252
Canada's Indians. Revised Edition.
Wilson, James
Over a half million people in Canada today are identifiably of Native ancestry, legally categorized as Inuit (Eskimos), status Indians, or nonstatus Indians. Status Indians comprise 573 bands with total membership of about 300,000 people, most of whom live on 2,242 reserves. They are the direct responsibility of the federal government and have special legal standing that provides some privileges but heavily restricts their freedom. They have high rates of poverty, unemployment, substandard housing, school dropouts, infant mortality, suicide, and tuberculosis. Nonstatus Indians (usually Metis of mixed descent), having no special privileges and frequently rejected by both White and Indian communities, are often poorer than status Indians. This report describes some of the long-term social and historical causes of the Indians' problems, the legacy of intensive European colonial expansion during the 16th-19th centuries and of Victorian policies based on the principle that the Indian should be legally and physically set apart and protected against himself and the outside world. Also examined are changes since World War II: migration of many Indians to the cities; new government educational policies; the growing number and the achievements of Indian organizations; economic development strategies; and negotiations over aboriginal rights, land claims, and self-determination. A final section discusses the issue of Native rights within the debate over a new national constitution. (SV)
Minority Rights Group, 29 Crauen Street, London, England, United Kingdom (2.95 pounds net; $5.50 plus 20% surface mail postage and packing on orders of less than 10 reports).
Publication Type: Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Minority Rights Group, London (England).
Identifiers - Location: Canada